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Why You Should Care About the Flashing on Your Roof 

Flashing is the unsung hero of your roofing system. It keeps out bugs, water, and air of all temperatures at your roof’s weakest spots. Not a lot of people fully understand how important their flashing really is! Here at Accent Roofing, a significant number of roof repairs we perform are simply flashing work. When flashing needs to be repaired, small defects can look like big problems. The good news is, a lot of these repairs are simple and relatively inexpensive. Here’s what your flashing does – and why you should be giving it more credit. Flashing: Your Roof’s Protector Flashing, typically made out of aluminum or another lightweight metal, is designed specifically to cover the gaps in your roofing system. Most of these gaps occur where your roof meets other things, such as your chimney or skylight, and others happen at the seams of the roof itself. Flashing is your roof’s first line of defense against all manner of threats, primarily water. How Do Flashing Issues Occur? Flashing doesn’t last forever, and it almost never lasts as long as the roof itself. Over time, nearly every kind of flashing will degrade. Over the years your flashing is likely to rust, to become warped in the heat or cold, and even to be knocked loose by falling pinecones or hail. Like any part of your roof, your flashing is only as effective as its installation, so the less professional your original flashing job, the sooner your flashing is likely to fail. When Flashing Stops Working From the ground, flashing may not look like much, but it’s vitally important to the overall health of your roof. Broken or bent flashing fast becomes an entry point into your home for unwanted water, and depending on the way the flashing is best, the water could actually be routed directly under your roof! When flashing isn’t functioning properly, moisture gets underneath your roof’s protective barriers and eventually, inside your house. This causes a multitude of problems like mildew, mold, and property damage. Malfunctioning flashing is also terrible for the effectiveness of your HVAC system. When flashing isn’t forming a tight enough seal at the joints of your roof, air gets in and out. This throws off the entire ventilation system inside your roof and drastically decreases the effectiveness of your heating and air conditioning systems. How…

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Should You Repair Your Roof or Replace It
Builder Working On Roof Of New Building

Should You Repair Your Roof or Replace It

There are a lot of reasons to repair your roof. Maybe it’s got a small leak, maybe it’s missing a few shingles, or maybe there’s just some light cracking and warping happening in your underlayer. But how do you know when your roof should be replaced instead of repaired? Of course, a local roofing professional will help you determine what’s best, but here are a few things to know about roof repair vs. roof replacement. Replace Your Roof When…You Can See Daylight in Your Attic You should never be able to see daylight coming into your attic from your roof. If you do, it indicates serious issues with the underlayers of your roofing system and with the impermeable membrane that stands between moisture and the rest of your house. If there are cracks leading up through your roof you can see with your eyes, odds are your roof needs more than a simple tune-up. Replace Your Roof When…Shingles Keep Falling Off One or two missing shingles over the life of your roof isn’t a huge deal. Shingles can be knocked off during storms or heavy winds. But if you notice missing shingles often, you might be headed towards a roof replacement. This is especially true if you’ve already had the missing shingles replaced more than once. Replace Your Roof When…You’re Finding Granules When your shingles start to lose their granules, they’re nearing the end of their effective life. If you spot or feel granules in your gutters, drains, or around the base of your house, your shingles are no longer as efficient as they used to be at repelling water and debris. Most commercial shingles are only rated to last for 10-20 years, so if your roof is older than that you know it’s probably time. Replace Your Roof When…You’ve Got Buckling or Pooling There’s a difference in roofing problems caused by materials that can easily be replaced and those that are caused by structural inefficiencies. If your roof is sagging in spots, pooling water, or otherwise visibly “buckling,” you should have serious concerns. Not only does this make your roof bad at repelling water, it can also leave it vulnerable to collapse. On the flip side… Repair Your Roof When…It’s a One-Time Leak Leaks happen! They’re just a fact of homeownership. A leaky roof isn’t necessarily one that needs to…

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What to do If Your Roof Fails the Home Inspection
Builder Working On Roof Of New Building

What to do If Your Roof Fails the Home Inspection

Home inspections are stressful. A good one can give prospective homebuyers the peace of mind they need to sign on the dotted line. A bad one can sink a home sale in seconds flat. Roofing issues are some of the most commonly reported by home inspectors, especially in a climate like Georgia’s. If your home inspection turned up a bad roof report, what should you do? Whether you’re the buyer or the seller, Accent Roofing offers advice you can take to the bank. If You’re the Seller: First things first: don’t panic! No good buyer’s agent on the planet would let a buyer “leave money” on the table by not asking for something based on the results of a home inspection. Unless you’re selling your house “as-is,” you should expect some complaints. The next thing you’ll want to do is try and understand the severity of the issues reported in the inspection. “Roofing problems” can cover a wide variety of issues, from a missing shingle or two to a totally rotten underlayment. Either way, you’re going to want to bring in a pro of your own. Your best course of action is to hire your own professional roofer for a second opinion. Remember that home inspectors are not professional roofers! Just because they think something’s seriously wrong with your roof doesn’t mean there is. The home inspector technically works for the buyer; you need a professional in your corner. Once your roofer gives you the scoop, you have options. You can choose to fix the roof on your own dime, or you can offer the buyer a “credit” for the repairs. You also have the option of ignoring inspection and your roofer’s repair advice but be forewarned that anything you find out during the inspection process becomes a “material fact,” which means you have to reveal it to the next buyer who comes along should your current contract fall through. For most people, choosing to repair the roof is usually less costly than forking over a credit to buyers. For some sellers, though, like those who’ve already moved out of the home or those who need an entirely new roof, giving the buyers money off the transaction makes more sense than going through the trouble of the repairs themselves. If You Are the Buyer There’s nothing more disheartening then getting a bad inspection report when you’re excited to buy a house! Roofing…

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Common Issues with Metal Roofing

Metal roofing is enjoying a meteoric rise in popularity, particularly here in the south. Prefabricated metal roofing has a specific aesthetic appeal, and it’s an ideal choice for houses built (or novated) in the “modern farmhouse” style.Compared to traditional asphalt shingled roofing, metal roofs are significantly more expensive. A lot of people think it’s worth it, however, for the longer lifespan and reduced maintenance that come part-and-parcel with these kinds of roofs. Metal roofs are also much lighter, fire resistant, eco-friendly, and relatively quick to install. Here at Accent Roofing, we work with all kinds of Georgia roofs. In case you’re considering metal, here are a few of the most common issues we see with metal roofs. Denting Denting can be a problem for metal roofs. We always advise our customers to strongly consider “dent-proof” metals, and also to remember that some metals – like steel – are stronger than others – like aluminum. Metal roofs can be dented in a variety of ways, especially during one of our strong hail storms or when being walked on by an inexperienced roofer. In most cases, dents are purely aesthetic problems but in situations where the dent is particularly deep, an issue with water runoff may develop. Oil Canning Also known as “stress wrinkling” or “elastic buckling,” oil canning is when the flat parts of a metal roof begin to appear wavy and even buckle in places. It is very common and is typically a byproduct of the actual metal itself, not (necessarily) the installation process. Once metal roofs begin to oil can, the affected panels must be replaced to solve the issue. Ways to prevent canning include using a thicker metal sheeting, choosing a “stretched” metal, and having the roof installed over a totally flat decking. Leaking Leaks are the number one problem for almost any roof, and metal is no exception. Metal roofs tend to leak most at their fastener points but proper installation can help. A number of factors can make leaks more likely on a metal roof including driving rain, heavy wind, structural damage, and even back-to-back ice events. When installing a metal roof the flashing, seams, and fasteners are the most important areas to pay attention to for preventing leaks. Scratching Almost all modern metal roofs have some type of coating. In many cases, the coating also doubles as a paint,…

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How to Prepare to Have Your Roof Replaced

Your roof is one of the most important – and most expensive! – components of your home. It’s totally understandable that homeowners would be interested in extending the lifespan of their roof as long as possible. Replacing a roof is always a big investment. So, how often does your roof really need to be replaced? The experts at Accent Roofing, one of Atlanta’s best roofing companies, weigh in. Roofing Materials Matter The number one factor that will determine exactly how long your roof will last is what it’s made of. Certain roofing materials are more durable than others and more likely to hold up in conditions like rain, hail, or strong winds. Here’s a general guide to how long several common roofing materials can be expected to last: Composition Shingles: 12-22 years Asphalt Shingles: 15-30 years Wooden (Cedar) Shingles: 15-25 years Tile Shingles: 40-50 years Metal Roofs: 50-75 years Why the Discrepancy? Because different materials require different levels of maintenance. Composition shingles, for example, are low-cost but also on the low-end of the durability spectrum, depending on the style and brand. A very well-maintained composition shingle roof can last more than two decades! A composition roof that’s never cleaned, inspected, or repaired might only last 12-15 years. Remember that roof maintenance is compounding. You can’t ignore your roof for ten years then expect to make up for lost time with one big repair job. The more regularly you have your roof inspected the earlier on you’ll catch little issues that can turn into big ones: missing shingles, loose flashing, leaking underlayment, and more. How Can You Tell When It’s Time to Replace Your Roof? There are a few tell-tale signs it might be getting close to time to replace your roof. Sagging, especially when obvious from the ground, is a key indicator that the roof’s structural integrity has been compromised. A significant number of missing shingles could also mean it will be less expensive to have your roof replaced than repaired. The only way to know for sure? Have your roof inspected by a professional roofing company! Some roofing issues, even serious ones, can only be determined through a thorough and comprehensive inspection. Having a roofer walk your roof, use tools to measure the moisture levels in your attic, and test the veracity of the materials used in its construction is the only way to really know its condition. How Long Does Roofing Replacement…

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